dirk hr spennemann

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Australian History
Publications by Dirk HR Spennemann
 

 

2015
Spennemann, Dirk HR (2015) Nineteenth Century Indigenous Land Use of Albury (NSW), as reflected in the historic sources. Institute for Land, Water and Society Report no. 83. Albury, NSW: Institute for Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University.

ISBN 978-1-86-467262-6
This study summarises nineteenth century observations on Indigenous presence and use in the Albury area. The data have been culled from diaries, contemporary newspapers, maps and other publications. A major section deals with the various manifestations of Mungabareena (station, reserve, ford) and a general discussion of the various crossing places/fords across the Murray River.
[PDF document, Full text]

Spennemann, Dirk HR (2015) The Disappearing Goanna. Twenty years' of Accelerated Callus Growth obscuring the Design of A Carved Tree, Mungabareena Reserve, Albury (NSW). Institute for Land, Water and Society Report no. 87. Albury, NSW: Institute for Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University.

Iv, 14 pp., ISBN 978-1-86-467267-1; DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3627.1206
During the 1994 NganGirra Festival, artist Darren Wighton carved a goanna into a river red gum at Mungabareena Reserve, Albury. This study compiles pictorial evidence of the appearance of the carving over time and examines the rate of callus growth obscuring the design. Management options are also discussed.
[PDF document, Full text]

 

2014
Spennemann, Dirk HR (2014) Keeping it in the family: Land use and cultural cohesion in the colonial German settlements of Southern New South Wales, 1860–1940. Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society vol. 100 (1), pp. 48–68

The Germans who migrated to the Riverina area of Southern NSW in the second half of the nineteenth century provide a useful historic case study to examine how the patterns of intermarriage among an ethnic community persisted and to what degree this is manifested in the selection of land allotments and cohabitation. An examination of parish maps, birth and marriages registers showed that the first locally born clustered spatially and expressed a high degree of endogamy. Endogamy in the second generation forced for marriages to occur further afield. The third locally born generation finally married outside their ethnic boundaries

 

2013
Spennemann, Dirk HR (2013) The Robbins & Porter Monoplane of 1913. Statement of significance. Albury: Institute for Land Water and Society, Charles Sturt University. 49pp

The aircraft built in the first half of 1913 by the Albury mechanics Azor Robbins and Alexander Porter is of high cultural significance as it was the first Australian-designed and Australian-built monoplane, fitted with the first Australian-built air-cooled aircraft engine, that actually became airborne and flew.
    In 1911 Melbourne mechanic Azor Robbins, collaborating with Aubrey Locke, developed a flat-four, lightweight air-cooled aircraft engine to power a biplane by local designer Lawrence Marshall. As the engine, Australia's first air-cooled aircraft engine only delivered 40hp, it was underpowered for the heavy bi-plane and thus was not used. When Azor Robbins and his business partner Alexander Porter opened their motor garage in Albury they decided to use that engine for a monoplane they planned on building drawing on the design of the Bleriot XI and especially of the Bristol P-1. Their aircraft was complete in March 1913 when aviator W.E. Hart visited Albury, and was ground tested from May 1913 onwards at Bungowannah. In late July 1913 the plane flew for a short distance (~ 180m) in a straight line, which however does not qualify for 'controlled powered flight.' Even though Robbins and Porter had foreshadowed ongoing development, this never eventuated, probably due to demands by business and families.
    This document provides a Statement of Significance for the aircraft which is underpinned by an in-depth research documentation.
[PDF document, Full text]

 

2007
Spennemann, Dirk HR (2008) Echoes of the German Experience. Objects from the Jindera Pioneer Museum. Albury: {retro|spect} 32pp. ISBN 978 1 921220 09 8

ABSTRACT

 

2007
Hughes, S., Lunt, I.D., Spennemann, D. H. R (2009) Making sense of the ?Rabbit Acts?: An exploration of the efficacy of historic law in controlling an environmental catastrophe. First World Congress of Environmental History "Local Livelihoods And Global Challenges: Understanding Human Interaction With The Environment" Copenhagen, Denmark & Malm?, Sweden, August 48, 2009.

ABSTRACT

Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2007) GermanLanguage Books in Jindera. An illustrated Catalogue of Items held by the Jindera Pioneer Museum. Albury, NSW: {retro | spect}. 25 cm, x, 147 pp. ISBN 978 1 921220 02 9

A bibliographic analysis of a collection of German language books held by the Jindera Pioneer Museum. Noteworthy among them are one sixteenth and three seventeenth century religious texts. The study also traces the origins of the books, compiles background on the booksellers that supplied them, and from there develops a conceptual framework for the acquisition and retention of books by the German immigrant community.

Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2007) A Baunscheidt Homeopathic Medicine Kit in the Jindera Pioneer Museum. Studies in German Colonial Heritage (ISSN 18347797) n? 4, pp. 188

Baunscheidtism was a homeopathic skin irritation and exanthematous eruption method that rose to worldwide popularity during the early part of the second half of the nineteenth century. While the method was particularly popular in Germany, where it had been invented, important centres developed among German populations in Ohio in the USA as well as in Switzerland and Russia. Baunscheidt sold a kit that contained the tool (?Lebenswecker?) as well as a bottle of oil and a handbook. As result of his success the instrument, as well as the oil, were imitated widely, both in Germany and overseas, especially in the USA. This study is the first of its kind to compile details on make up and appearance of the known original Baunscheidt Lebenswecker as well as its imitations. A discussion of the proprietary oil, as well as of the various editions of Baunscheidt?s handbook is also given. An assessment of the cultural significance of the homeopathic kit rounds out the study.

Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2007) Gender bias after death: the case of the clergical cemetery, St. John?s Orphanage, Thurgoona, NSW, Australia. Journal of International Women?s Studies vol. 8 n? 4, pp. 6078.

Cemeteries are commonly seen as reflective of the historic environment in which they were created and therefore form a unique interpretive tool for the cultural heritage manager. As this case study of clergical cemetery documents, physical heritage of a cemetery may well reflect the power hierarchy at the time, but it does not accurately reflect the historic reality. The effective manipulation of the tangible evidence left behind for future generations has effectively enshrined a gender bias in perpetuity.

Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2007) Mapping the German Footprint in the Riverina in 1884. Studies in German Colonial Heritage (ISSN 18347797) n? 2, pp. 19

This study documents in the form of maps the nature of German settlement in the Southern Riverina as far as it can be gleaned from the 1884 census of land and stockholders.

Spennemann, Dirk H.R. and Sutherland, Gaye (2008) Late Nineteenth Century German Immigrant landand stockholdings in the Southern Riverina: an exploration of largescale spatial patterns. Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society vol. 94 n? 1, pp. 7490.

The paper examines the largescale spatial patterns of settlement by German Immigrants in the Southern Riverina during the late nineteenth century.

 

2004
Spennemann, Dirk H. R. (2004) Nathan A. Cobb in Jena 1887-88. Russian Journal of Nematology vol. 12 nª 1, pp. 79-84.

Nathan A. Cobb, often described as the father of American nematologial research, was a very pro-lific researcher. Drawing on published and archival information, this paper describes his early career and his study at the University of Jena (Germany) which laid the scientific foundations for his future career.

Hughes, Sue, Spennemann, Dirk H.R., Harvey, Ross (2004) Printing heritage of colonial newspapers in Victoria: the Ararat Advertiser and the Avoca Mail Bulletin of the Bibliographic Society of Australia and New Zealand vol. 28 no 3, 2004 [2005] 41-61. (NOT INCLUDED IN 2004 REPORT)
 

2003
Spennemann, Dirk H. R. (2003) Nathan Augustus Cobb Plant Pathologist. A Bibliography of his work. Albury, N.S.W. : retrospect.
xxxvii, 114 pages, ISBN 1 876940 09 3

Nathan August Cobb (1859–1932) was instrumental in developing a scientific approach to agriculture in New South Wales (Australia). From 1905 onwards he worked in Hawai'i and then the USA. This is the first comprehensive bibliography of Cobb's work, listing more than 550 items. It is preceded by an a biographical sketch. [PDF file, free download]

 

2001
Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2001) Wheat Varieties Grown in 19th Century Australia. A handlist of varieties. Wagga Wagga, N.S.W. : The Farrer Centre, Faculty of Science and Agriculture, Charles Sturt University

XXXX.
PDF file download

 

2000
Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2000) Centenary of olive processing at Charles Sturt University. Wagga Wagga, NSW: Faculty of Science and Agriculture, Charles Sturt University. 16pp. Second edition.

Revised reprint of a booklet setting out the history of the olivetum and olive production at the former Wagga Agricultural Experimental Farm, now Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga Campus. Describes the olivetum and lists the olive varieties planted there, and summarises the history of olive research carried out at Wagga Wagga.

Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2000) Combining science with education: the beginnings of agricultural extension in 1890s New South Wales (Australia). Rural Society 10(2), pp. 175-194.

Agricultural extension started in New South Wales (Australia) with the commencement of the Department of Agriculture in 1890 and the establishment of a body of scientists to answer farmers' queries and to educate farmers in their findings. This paper charts the beginnings of extension and the various concepts developed, highlighting the contributions of Nathan A. Cobb (1859-1932).

 

1999
Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (1999) Centenary of olive processing at Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga, NSW: Faculty of Science and Agriculture, Charles Sturt University. 16pp.

Booklet setting out the history of the olivetum and olive production at the former Wagga Agricultural Experimental Farm, now Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga Campus. Describes the olivetum and lists the olive varieties planted there, and summarises the history of olive research carried out at Wagga Wagga.

 

1998
Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (1998) Nathan Cobbis Laboratory Conservation and Interpretation Project. The spread of olives (Olea sp.) on Wagga Wagga Campus. I. Biology and History. Johnstone Centre Report 100. Albury, NSW: The Johnstone Centre, Charles Sturt University.

 

1996
Spennemann, D.H.R. (1996) The three lives of St. Matthew's Anglican Church, Kiewa Street, Albury.. Johnstone Centre of Parks, Recreation and Heritage, Charles Sturt University, Albury NSW, Australia.
URL: http://life.csu.edu.au/~dspennem/Varia/St.Matthews/SM_Start.html [Developed as a case study for a student assignment]

This document forms part of the hypertext curriculum vitaeof Dr. Dirk H.R. Spennemann (Charles Sturt University, Albury, Australia). If you arrived at this page through a search engine you may wish to call up http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~dspennem which will link you to the top of the frame-based CV.