dirk hr spennemann photography

 

{: camera | topia :}



 
Adjusting the shutter cocking mechanism
 

Widelux F7

A Widelux F7 was acquired at low cost on Yahoo Japan (through the kind services of the proprietor of Men's Gangu). The F7 was advertised by the seller as having "exposure problems." It was acquired as a future source of spare parts to repair the Widelux F6B should the need arise. When the camera arrived, a preliminary examination showed that all functions of the camera seemed to work correctly. The turret could be wound and moved freely, the shutter speeds seemed/sounded correct and the aperture closed/opened smoothly. Running the shutter with the back open, however, showed that the shutter slit did not open during the exposure movement of the turret.

Earlier, when assessing another Widelux F7 that exhibited massive banding, I had found references to Widelux repairs published the 'Widelux Worldwide HQ" and hosted. On his page Widelux Repair & Overhaul, Model F7 Jesse Newcomb notes that if the shutter slit is not fully opened, then that was a sign that the winding of the turret stopped before it reached its fully cocked position. He recommended to adjust the wind stop lever. Below is a photo documention of the work I did as I find it beneficial to document my steps in a series of visual notes, so that I can put things back together again properly.

But to state this upfront and uneqivocally: IF YOU FOLLOW ANY OF THE PROCESS SHOWN BELOW, YOU DO SO AT YOUR OWN RISK !! I DO NOT WARRANT THAT THIS IS THE CORRECT WAY AND THAT IT WILL PRODUCE RECIPROCABLE RESULTS. It worked for me, and that is all.

1 Bottomplate removed

 

Relax the turret (press the shutter) Remove the two screws on the front underneath the turret. Remove the two screws on the bottom plate. Pull off the bottom plate. Remove the two brass spacer tubes (unless firmly glued on).

Widelux F7—Adjusting the shutter cocking mechanism

2 Appearance of the turret base with the turret relaxed

 

The winder stop lever has tripped and the peg of the turret has hit the buffer (top left).

Widelux Shutter Adjustment 2 Turret Relaxed

3 Appearance of the turret base with the turret wound up

 

The foot of the winder stop lever blocks the winder shaft clicked into a cam under the gear The turret is almost fully wound and the peg of the turret is close to the cocked position (bottom). NOTE that the literature states that the turret peg should never reach the end of its travel, but that there should always be small gap. What happened here is that the winder stop lever engaging before the turret had reached the cocked position.

Widelux Shutter Adjustment 3 Turret wound up

4 The turret positions side by side

 

The image below shows the two peg positions on the turret.

Widelux Shutter Adjustment 4 Turret positions

To check that the slit would open if the turret could be wound a bit further, I activated the winder stop lever and advanced the turret a fraction (two audible clicks). When the shutter was activated, the slit had indeed opened a small bit. I repeated the procedure and found that an advance of four clicks sufficed to ensure a fully open slit. To fix this, it was required to lift the stop cam gear and reseat it in order to move the stop point.

5 Winder Ratchet in place

 

The next image shows the status quo before any microsurgery commenced.
The big cog wheel is the winder ratchet with the small stop lever.

Widelux Shutter Adjustment 5 Winder Ratchet in place

6 Winder Ratchet plate exposed

 

Removing the cog wheel exposes the ratchet plate of the winder mechanism

Widelux Shutter Adjustment 6 Winder Ratchet plate exposed

7 Winder Ratchet plate removed

 

Removing the ratchet plate exposes the winder mechanism

Widelux Shutter Adjustment 7 Winder Ratchet plate removed

The silver cog wheel is the stop cam gear. It had to be gently lifted up and turned counter clockwise (TWO teeth) and dropped back in again. Test of the shutter showed that the turret turned further and that the slit was open when the shutter was released. All that remained was to put it back together again, retracing the steps

The greatest pain in the reassemble where the two long screws that hold the bottom plate from below. They are very thin but long and have to target commensurately small holes. What made the matter decidely entertaining were the two pesky brass spacer tubes which decided on lifes of their own. The matter was not helped by the fact that the bottom plate on this F7 was a very tight fit